Coleridge Initiative

Value of Science: Data, Products & Use

June 23-24,2021

Julia Lane

Julia Lane

Co-Founder, The Coleridge Initiative
Professor, New York University

Julia is a cofounder of the Coleridge Initiative and a Professor and a Provostial Fellow at NYU. She is the author or editor of 12 books and over 80 scientific articles. Julia is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International Statistical Institute and the American Statistical Association. She is the recipient of the 2014 Julius Shiskin award, the 2014 Roger Herriot award and the 2017 Warren E. Miller Award.

Julia Lane's Resources

Paul Romer

Paul Romer

Professor, New York University
2018 Nobel Laureate in Economic Sciences

Paul Romer is an economist and policy entrepreneur and co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economics Sciences. He has spent his career at the intersection of economics, innovation, technology, and urbanization, working to speed up human progress. His title is University Professor at NYU, with an affiliation in the School of Law. Before coming to NYU, Paul taught at Stanford, and while there, started Aplia, an education technology company he later sold to Thomson Learning. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Chicago.

Paul Romer's Resources

Toby Smith

Toby Smith

Vice President for Science Policy & Global Affairs, Association of American Universities

Toby Smith has served at AAU since January 2003. As Vice President for Policy, he oversees AAU’s policy projects, initiatives and activities including the AAU Undergraduate STEM education and PhD education initiatives. He is responsible for matters relating to science and innovation policy and broader impacts of science. He shares responsibility for matters concerning research costs and compliance issues including facilities and administrative costs, export controls, scientific openness and security, technology transfer and regulatory reform. He also staffs the Senior Research Officers constituent group. Prior to joining AAU in January 2003, Toby worked as a federal relations representative in the Washington D.C. Offices of the University of Michigan (1999-2002) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1992-1999). He began his Washington career on Capitol Hill as a legislative assistant to Congressman Bob Traxler (D-Michigan). Toby has written and spoken widely on science policy and funding issues. He is the co-author a book on national science policy published in 2008 by the University of Michigan Press titled, Beyond Sputnik – U.S. Science Policy in the 21st Century. He is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Roundtable on the Communication and Use of Social and Behavioral Sciences and serves on the Advisory Board to the National Alliance for Broader Impacts (NABI). He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Toby holds a master’s degree in Legislative Affairs from George Washington University, and a Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree from the University of Michigan.

Toby Smith's Resources

Emilda Rivers

Emilda Rivers

Director, National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics

Emilda B. Rivers is the director of the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES), the principal statistical agency housed as a division within the National Science Foundation (NSF)’s Social, Behavioral, and Economic Directorate. NCSES serves as a clearinghouse for information about the US science and engineering enterprise, often in a global context. Prior to her appointment as NCSES director, Rivers was the NCSES deputy director. She previously led the center’s largest program area: the Human Resources Statistics Program. She has also worked for the US Census Bureau and US Energy Information Administration. In 2017, Rivers was named by Forbes as one of 25 Women Leading Data and Analytics in the US Government. She graduated top of her class in mathematics from South Carolina State University and has a Master of Science degree from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Michael Stebbins

Michael Stebbins

President, Science Advisors, LLC
Former Assistant Director for Biotechnology in Obama White House Office of Science and Technology

Michael Stebbins is a geneticist, and public policy expert who served as the Assistant Director for Biotechnology in the Obama White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. He is currently the President of Science Advisors, a science and health consulting firm he founded in 2018 to provide science, technology, and public policy guidance to private companies, philanthropies, and non-profit organizations. He previously served as the Vice President of Science and Technology for the Laura and John Arnold Foundation where he was responsible for identifying and pursuing opportunities for philanthropic investment in science. While at the White House, Dr. Stebbins developed eight Executive Orders and other directives addressing issues ranging from the antibiotic resistance crisis in the US to restoring pollinator health. His work led to broad changes in practice across the Federal government regarding the purchasing of bio-based products, improving veterans’ mental health, increasing access to federally funded scientific research publications and data, improving scientific reproducibility, evaluating and addressing the preferential purchasing of antibiotic free meats, reforming the regulatory system for biotechnology products, and improving the management of scientific collections. Dr. Stebbins previously served as a science advisor to the Obama Presidential Campaign and on the Obama White House Transition Team. He is the former director of biology policy for the Federation of American Scientists, co-founded, and served on the board of directors for, Scientists and Engineers for America. He previously worked for U.S. Senator Harry Reid and at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Before coming to Washington, he was a senior editor at Nature Genetics.

Bruce Weinberg

Bruce Weinberg

Professor, The Ohio State University

Bruce A. Weinberg received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1996 before joining the faculty at the Ohio State University, where he is now Professor of Economics and Public Administration. His research has been published in journals including The American Economic Review, The Journal of Political Economy, The Review of Economics and Statistics, The Economic Journal, and The Journal of Labor Economics. This research spans three areas. The first is the economics of innovation and creativity. This work studies how creativity and innovation varies over the life cycle and how an individual’s own creativity is affected by the presence of other important innovators. He also studies migration of innovators, trends in innovative competitiveness across countries, and the economic impacts of innovation. The second area is family and neighborhood determinants of youth outcomes and behavior. This work studies how youth behaviors, including employment, delinquency, cognitive development, and risky behaviors, are affected by their families and peer groups. The third research area concerns technological change, industrial shifts, and the wage structure. This work studies how computerization and the shift from manufacturing to services have affected the gender wage gap, the racial wage gap, and the returns to experience. He has held visiting positions at the Hoover Institution at Stanford, the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard; and the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He is a Research Associate at the NBER and a Research Fellow at the Institute for Labor (IZA), Bonn. He is an associate editor of the New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics and Regional Science and Urban Economics and currently serves as Director of Undergraduate Studies in Economic at the Ohio State University. His research has been supported by the Federal Reserve, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Templeton Foundation. He has advised policy makers at a variety of levels and currently chairs the Modeling Subcommittee of the Biomedical Research Workforce Taskforce of the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health. His work has been covered publicly in/on the Economic Report of the President, ABC Radio, Business Week, The Chronicle of Higher Education, CNN, The Economist, The Financial Times; MSN/Slate, Nature, The New York Times, Scientific American, The Wall Street Journal and U.S. News and World Report and abroad in Britain, Canada, and Russia.

Bruce Weinberg's Resources

Andrew Toole

Andrew Toole

Chief Economist, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Dr. Andrew Toole is the Chief Economist at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and a Research Associate at the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW). Dr. Toole joined the USPTO with experience in the private sector, academia, and government. While completing his Ph.D. in economics at Michigan State University, Andrew Toole was a Senior Economist for Laurits R. Christensen Associates where he conducted studies on total factor productivity, cost and price analysis, and competitive strategy. In 1998, Dr. Toole went to Stanford University as a postdoctoral student before becoming a faculty member at Illinois State University and Rutgers University in New Jersey. As an academic researcher, Dr. Toole was asked to advise on science and technology policy issues for institutions such as the U.S. National Academies of Science, U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In 2010, he joined the Science Policy Branch of USDA’s Economic Research Service. His research focuses on the economics of innovation, intellectual property, and related science and technology policies. Dr. Toole has published in the Journal of Law and Economics, the Review of Economics and Statistics, Research Policy, Management Science, and many other peer-reviewed journals.

Andrew Toole's Resources

Henry Kautz

Henry Kautz

Division Director, National Science Foundation Division of Information and Intelligent Systems
Professor, University of Rochester

Henry Kautz is serving as Division Director for Information & Intelligent Systems (IIS) at the National Science Foundation where he leads the National AI Research Institutes program. He is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science and was the founding director of the Goergen Institute for Data Science at the University of Rochester. He has been a researcher at AT&T Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ, and a full professor at the University of Washington, Seattle. In 2010, he was elected President of the Association for Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), and in 2016 was elected Chair of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Section on Information, Computing, and Communication. His interdisciplinary research includes practical algorithms for solving worst-case intractable problems in logical and probabilistic reasoning; models for inferring human behavior from sensor data; pervasive healthcare applications of AI; and social media analytics. In 1989 he received the IJCAI Computers & Thought Award, which recognizes outstanding young scientists in artificial intelligence, and 30 years later received the 2018 ACM-AAAI Allen Newell Award for career contributions that have breadth within computer science and that bridge computer science and other disciplines. At the 2020 AAAI Conference he received both the Distinguished Service Award and the Robert S. Engelmore Memorial Lecture Award.

Jonathan Auerbach

Johnathan Auerbach

Assistant Professor, George Mason University

Jonathan Auerbach is a PhD student in the Department of Statistics at Columbia University. He was the 2015 Wray Jackson Smith Scholar and winner of the 2014 Young Statisticians Writing Competition. He is a member of Bayesian State of Mind, which in 2017 won the grand prize of $20,000 for its prediction of student enrollment in New York City Department of Education’s Call for Innovation. Before Columbia, Jonathan was a researcher at the Center for Urban Research in the City University of New York, and before that, an analyst for New York City’s legislature, the City Council. His interests include urban analytics, public policy, open data and statistical methodology.

Jeff Jonas

Jeff Jonas

Founder and CEO, Senzing, Inc.

Jeff Jonas is an acclaimed data scientist. He is at the forefront of solving some of the world’s most complex business and big data problems for government and companies. A former IBM fellow, Jonas is the leading creator of entity resolution systems. National Geographic recognized him as the Wizard of Big Data, and today numerous organizations rely on his systems to extract useful intelligence from tsunamis of data. For more than three decades, Jonas has focused on creating technologies that solve the world’s biggest data challenges, while also being an advocate for privacy and civil liberties. He has tackled many high-profile challenges, including identifying potential terrorists, detecting fraudulent behavior in casinos, connecting loved ones after a natural disaster, and modernizing voter registration systems. A three-time entrepreneur, Jonas sold his last company to IBM in 2005. With his latest company Senzing, he is first focused on democratizing entity resolution – making this complicated task for programmers easy.

Jeff Jonas' Resources

Helen Nissenbaum

Helen Nissenbaum

Professor, Cornell Tech

Helen Nissenbaum is director of the Digital Life Initiative and Professor of Information Science at Cornell Tech. Her books include Obfuscation: A User's Guide to Privacy and Protest (with Finn Brunton), Values at Play in Digital Games (with Mary Flanagan), and Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life, where she lays out the theory of contextual integrity. Her research spans topics of privacy, security, accountability, bias, data concentration, and values in design as manifest in digital technologies. Beyond academic publication, Nissenbaum works on free software tools, Adnauseam and TrackMeNot, defending privacy, autonomy, and freedom online. She holds a BA (Hons) in mathematics and philosophy from the University of Witwatersrand and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Stanford University.

Helen Nissenbaum's Resources

Rayid Ghani

Rayid Ghani

Professor, Carnegie Mellon University

Rayid Ghani is a Distinguished Career Professor in the Machine Learning Department in the School of Computer Science and the Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. He is a co-founder of Edgeflip, an analytics startup that grew out of the Obama 2012 Campaign, focused on social media products for non-profits, advocacy groups, and charities. Ghani also started and runs the Eric & Wendy Schmidt Data Science for Social Good Summer Fellowship.

Rayid Ghani's Resources

Mary Bohman

Mary Bohman

Deputy Director, Bureau of Economic Analysis

Mary Bohman is the Acting Director and Deputy Director of the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Dr. Bohman works with BEA's executive team to expand the agency's statistical programs and to shape the highest priority research projects in furthering BEA's mission. Dr. Bohman is collaborating with BEA’s researchers to bolster the impact and the effectiveness of BEA research. And, she has led the way in crafting a strategy to position BEA to be an employer of choice for the years to come. Before joining BEA, Dr. Bohman spent more than 20 years with the Department of Agriculture in numerous positions, leaving her mark on research involving international trade, farm competitiveness, and data-driven policymaking. At the Agriculture Department, Dr. Bohman was the administrator of USDA's Economic Research Service, where over a seven-year period she led initiatives to strengthen the quality of the agency's research and statistics, increase accountability through the development of metrics, and boost employee engagement through improved communications. She was named a Fellow of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association, the group’s most prestigious honor, in recognition for her outstanding contributions to the agricultural economics profession. Dr. Bohman received a doctorate from the Department of Agricultural Economics at the University of California, Davis, and earned a bachelor's degree from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service.

Xiao-Li Meng

Xiao-Li Meng

Professor, Harvard University
Founding Editor-in-Chief, Harvard Data Science Review

Xiao-Li Meng, the Whipple V. N. Jones Professor of Statistics, and the Founding Editor-in-Chief of Harvard Data Science Review, is well known for his depth and breadth in research, his innovation and passion in pedagogy, his vision and effectiveness in administration, as well as for his engaging and entertaining style as a speaker and writer. Meng was named the best statistician under the age of 40 by COPSS (Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies) in 2001, and he is the recipient of numerous awards and honors for his more than 150 publications in at least a dozen theoretical and methodological areas, as well as in areas of pedagogy and professional development. He has delivered more than 400 research presentations and public speeches on these topics, and he is the author of “The XL-Files," a thought-provoking and entertaining column in the IMS (Institute of Mathematical Statistics) Bulletin. His interests range from the theoretical foundations of statistical inferences (e.g., the interplay among Bayesian, Fiducial, and frequentist perspectives; frameworks for multi-source, multi-phase and multi- resolution inferences) to statistical methods and computation (e.g., posterior predictive p-value; EM algorithm; Markov chain Monte Carlo; bridge and path sampling) to applications in natural, social, and medical sciences and engineering (e.g., complex statistical modeling in astronomy and astrophysics, assessing disparity in mental health services, and quantifying statistical information in genetic studies). Meng received his BS in mathematics from Fudan University in 1982 and his PhD in statistics from Harvard in 1990. He was on the faculty of the University of Chicago from 1991 to 2001 before returning to Harvard, where he served as the Chair of the Department of Statistics (2004-2012) and the Dean of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (2012-2017).

Frauke Kreuter

Frauke Kreuter

Professor, University of Maryland College Park Professor, University of Munich

Frauke Kreuter is a sociologist and statistician who works as professor and Director of the Joint Program in Survey Methodology of the University of Maryland, College Park. She also holds a professorship at the University of Mannheim, and is Head of the Statistical Methods Research Department at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB) in Nuremberg, Germany.

Liz MacPherson

Liz MacPherson

Assistant Commissioner, Office of Privacy Commissioner (New Zealand)
Former Government Statistician and Chief Executive of Statistics New Zealand

Liz has had a distinguished career of public service and has held a number of Deputy Chief Executive roles before being appointed to the position of Government Statistician, a position she retained until late last year. In addition to her wide and extensive leadership, management, policy, operations & regulatory experience, Liz has previously worked together with the Privacy Commissioner on a number of projects over the years. As a previous Government Statistician and Government Chief Data Steward, Liz understands the value and importance of privacy, and its role in maintaining trust.

Liz MacPherson's Resources

Jessica Cunningham

Jessica Cunningham

Executive Director, Kentucky Center for Statistics

Dr. Cunningham is the Executive Director, formerly the Research and Analytics Director for three years prior, at the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS). She has a Doctorate in Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation from University of Kentucky specializing in Measurement and Statistics, as well as M.S. and B.S. degrees in Mathematics from the University of Kentucky and Georgetown College respectively. Dr. Cunningham served as a faculty member teaching graduate education courses in research methods, statistics, program evaluation, and classroom assessment. Dr. Cunningham also served as an evaluator over the past eight years on numerous state and federal grants across multiple disciplines in North Carolina and Kentucky. Dr. Cunningham oversees the development, maintenance, and reporting for the Kentucky Longitudinal Data System (KLDS) and the Kentucky Labor Market Information. Dr. Cunningham guides a team of research analysts developing meaningful reports for policymakers, practitioners, and the public on topics related to education and workforce outcomes. These reports cover all pathways of education through the workforce—ranging from early childhood learning through labor market outcomes.

Jessica Cunningham's Resources

Jevin West

Jevin West

Associate Professor, University of Washington

Jevin West is an Associate Professor in the Information School at the University of Washington. He is the Director of the new Center for an Informed Public at UW aimed at resisting strategic misinformation, promoting an informed society and strengthening democratic discourse. He is also the co-founder of the DataLab at UW, a Data Science Fellow at the eScience Institute, and Affiliate Faculty for the Center for Statistics & Social Sciences. His research and teaching focus on the impact of technology on science and society, with a focus on slowing the spread of misinformation. He is also the co-author of the new book, Calling Bullshit: The Art of Skepticism in a Data-Driven World, which helps non-experts question numbers, data, and statistics without an advanced degree in data science.

Jevin West's Resources

Daniel Goroff

Daniel Goroff

Vice President and Program Director, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Division Director, National Science Foundation Division of Social and Economic Sciences

Daniel Goroff is Vice President and Program Director at the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, a private charity that supports breakthroughs in science, technology, and economics. He is currently on temporary and part-time loan to the National Science Foundation (NSF) serving as Division Director for Social and Economic Sciences. A former Division Director at the National Research Council (NRC), Goroff has twice worked for the President’s Science Advisor in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), most recently as Assistant Director for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences. Daniel Goroff is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Economics at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, where he also served as Dean of the Faculty and Vice President for Academic Affairs. During twenty years before that at Harvard University, he rose in rank from Assistant Professor of Mathematics to Professor of the Practice and Associate Director of the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. A winner of the Phi Beta Kappa Award—the highest recognition for educational excellence in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Science—Goroff not only developed and taught courses in mathematics, but also in physics, economics, engineering, and history of science, as well as a pioneering course on “Decisions, Games, and Negotiations” that was popular online, too. The Masters Program he founded and directed at Harvard on “Mathematics for Teaching” still enrolls dozens of degree candidates each year. Daniel Goroff’s research interests include optimization over time, decision-making under uncertainty, the mathematics of privacy, and the economics of science. He has held extended visiting positions at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, the Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques in Paris, the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in Berkeley, the Dibner Institute at MIT, Columbia University’s Teachers College, and the Bellagio Residency Program for Academic Writing in Italy. Books he edited include one on Science and Engineering Careers with Richard Freeman and another three-volume translation with an extended introduction for Henri Poincaré’s Les Méthodes Nouvelles de la Mécanique Céleste. Daniel Goroff earned an B.A.-M.A. summa cum laude in Mathematics as a Borden Scholar at Harvard in 1978, an M.Phil. in Economics as a Churchill Scholar at Cambridge University in 1979, a Masters in Mathematical Finance as an HMC Scholar at Boston University in 2008, a Ph.D. in Mathematics at Princeton University as a Danforth Fellow in 1984, and completed an Executive Education Program for Nonprofit Leaders at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business in 2013. He was elected to the Faculty Council at Harvard in 1991, to the Board of Directors of the American Association for Higher Education in 1994, to the Board of Directors of the Global Legal Entity Identifier Foundation in 2016, and to the Board of Trustees of Smith College in 2016. Daniel Goroff has presented Congressional testimony about science policy before both the House and the Senate. A Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, he helped found the Science Philanthropy Alliance, the Research on Research Institute, and the Societal Experts Action Network. For his support of research on data science and economic measurement, Goroff won the American Statistical Association’s 2020 Links Lecture Award.

Daniel Goroff's Resources

Barry Johnson

Barry Johnson

Director, Statistics of Income Division, Internal Revenue Service

James Evans

James Evans

Professor, University of Chicago

Dr. James Evans focuses on the collective system of thinking and knowing, ranging from the distribution of attention and intuition, the origin of ideas and shared habits of reasoning to processes of agreement (and dispute), accumulation of certainty (and doubt), and the texture—novelty, ambiguity, topology—of human understanding. He is especially interested in innovation—how new ideas and practices emerge—and the role that social and technical institutions (e.g. the Internet, markets, collaborations) play in collective cognition and discovery. Much of his work has focused on areas of modern science and technology, but he is also interested in other domains of knowledge—news, law, religion, gossip, hunches, and historical modes of thinking and knowing. He supports the creation of novel observatories for human understanding and action through crowd sourcing, information extraction from text and images, and the use of distributed sensors (e.g. RFID tags, cell phones). He uses machine learning, generative modeling, social and semantic network representations to explore knowledge processes, scale up interpretive and field-methods, and create alternatives to current discovery regimes. His research is funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Templeton Foundation and other sources, and has been published in Science, American Journal of Sociology, Social Studies of Science,Administrative Science Quarterly, PLoS Computational Biology and other journals. His work has been featured in Nature, the Economist, Atlantic Monthly, Wired, NPR, BBC, El País, CNN and many other outlets. At Chicago, Dr. Evans is the Director of Knowledge Lab (http://knowledgelab.org), which has collaborative, granting and employment opportunities, as well as ongoing seminars. He also sponsors the Computational Social Science workshop (with John Brehm) and the Knowledge-Value workshop (with John Kelly) and co-organizes the Rational Choice workshop (with Gary Becker, Richard Posner & Glen Weyl). He teaches courses in the history of modern science, science studies, computational content analysis, and Internet and Society. Before Chicago, he received his doctorate in sociology from Stanford University, served as a research associate in the Negotiation, Organizations, and Markets group at Harvard Business School, started a private high school focused on project-based arts education, and completed a BA in Anthropology and Economics at Brigham Young University.

James Evans's Resources

Kaye Husbands Fealing

Kaye Husbands Fealing

Dean, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts at Georgia Institute of Technology

Kaye Husbands Fealing is Dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts at the Georgia Institute of Technology, formerly the Chair of the School of Public Policy Georgia Tech. She specializes in science of science and innovation policy, the public value of research expenditures, and the underrepresentation of women and minorities in STEM fields and workforce. Prior to her position at Georgia Tech, Husbands Fealing taught at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, and she was a study director at the National Academy of Sciences. Prior to the Humphrey School, she was the William Brough professor of economics at Williams College, where she began her teaching career in 1989. She developed and was the inaugural program director for the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Science of Science and Innovation Policy program and co-chaired the Science of Science Policy Interagency Task Group, chartered by the Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Policy Council. At NSF, she also served as an Economics Program director. Husbands Fealing was a visiting scholar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Technology Policy and Industrial Development, where she conducted research on NAFTA’s impact on the Mexican and Canadian automotive industries, and research on strategic alliances between aircraft contractors and their subcontractors. Husbands Fealing is an Elected Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, an Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and serves on the AAAS Executive Board. She was awarded the 2017 Trailblazer Award from the National Medical Association Council on Concerns of Women Physicians. She currently serves on NSF’s Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering, NSF's Education and Human Resources Directorate's Advisory Committee, the General Accountability Office’s Science, Technology Assessment, and Analytics Polaris Council, and the Georgia Intellectual Property Alliance. She is a board member for the Society for Economic Measurement. She has served on several committees and panels, including: several AAAS committees; three National Academies’ panels; two Council of Canadian Academies panels; two American Academy of Arts and Sciences working groups; NSF’s Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Advisory Committee; NIH’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences Council; and the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in the Economic Profession. At Georgia Tech, she serves on the Institute for Data Engineering and Science Council, the Intellectual Property Advisory Board, and the Ivan Allen College Diversity Council. Husbands Fealing holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University, and a B.A. in mathematics and economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Kaye Husbands Fealing's Resources

Christine Chomienne

Christine Chomienne

Professor, The University of Paris

Christine Chomienne is Professor of Cellular Biology and Hematology at the Université de Paris, France. She is currently Vice-Chair of the Horizon Europe Cancer Mission Board at the European Commission. She was Director of Research and Innovation at the French National Cancer Institute (INCa) and Director of the Cancer Institute of France Research Organisations (Inserm & AVIESAN). She is past president of the European Hematology Association. She qualified in medicine at the Université Paris Diderot and received certification for specialized training in Hematology in 1983. She obtained her PhD in 1989. Dr. Chomienne has served on many scientific and clinical committees in France and Europe in Leukemia, Immunology, Oncology and Stem Cell Research. She was head of the Cell Biology Department at the Hôpital Saint Louis, Paris and Director of the University Inserm Research Laboratory at the Institut Universitaire d’Hématologie for the last 25 years. She is committed to education nationally and coordinator of different Courses and Masters at the University Paris Diderot. She established the Institute of PhD Schools at the University Paris Diderot (23 PhD of all disciplines) and coordinated an ITN Marie Curie FP7 on Cancer Stem Cells. She has recently been involved in patient/parent participation in cancer research and in communication, education on personalized medicine. Dr. Chomienne is author of more than 270 peer-reviewed publications and has received several scientific (Academia of Science) and French governmental awards (Chevalier et Officier de la Legion d’Honneur).

Spiro Stefanou

Spiro Stefanou

Administrator, United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service

Spiro Stefanou is the Administrator of the Economic Research Service at USDA since August 2020. He provides leadership and guidance for the agency research, analytical, and technical operations. Prior to his arrival at ERS, he held faculty appointments in Food and Resource Economics at the University of Florida, Business Economics at Wageningen University (Netherlands) and Agricultural Economics from Penn State University. He is a Fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association and held visiting positions at universities in Greece, Netherlands, Italy, Austria. Dr. Stefanou is the past editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy and has served on the editorial boards of six national and international journals. He received a B.A. in anthropology from George Washington University, M.S. in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of Maryland, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of California, Davis.

Jason Owen-Smith

Jason Owen-Smith

Professor, University of Michigan

Jason Owen-Smith is a sociologist who examines how complex networks among people and organizations shape knowledge-work and innovation. He is particularly interested in research universities and in the dynamics of scientific collaboration networks. Findings from this research have been published in outlets including Administrative Science Quarterly, the American Journal of Sociology, the American Sociological Review, Cell, Cell Stem Cell, Higher Education, JAMA Surgery, Management Science, Medical Care, Nature Biotechnology, Nature Methods, Organization Science, Research Policy, Science, and Social Studies of Science. Professor Owen-Smith is a co-founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Research on Innovation and Science (IRIS). He is also Professor of Sociology and Research Professor in the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan. In 2006, he received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award and an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Industries Studies Fellowship in Biotechnology. In 2008 he was awarded the University of Michigan's Henry Russel Award, which recognizes mid-career faculty for exceptional scholarship and conspicuous teaching ability. In 2014 he was awarded the LSA Excellence in Teaching Award and the John Dewey Award by the college of Literature, Science and the Arts. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology at the University of Arizona and a B.A. in Sociology and Philosophy from the New College of Florida.

Jason Owen-Smith's Resources

Ed Smith-Lewis

Ed Smith-Lewis

Executive Director, United Negro College Fund, Institute for Capacity Building

Ed Smith-Lewis is the Executive Director of the Institute for Capacity Building (ICB). Ed oversees all facets of ICB as well as CPI, a $50 million grant-funded initiative by the Lilly Endowment. Through strategic grant administration, Ed works with Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCUs) and Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs) to advance transformational change through the critical integration of student success-centered and career-building opportunities with the undergraduate liberal arts experience. The aim of the work is to support curricular enhancement that will lead to improved institutional and employment outcomes for all students. Most recently, Ed was an Associate Program Officer (APO) at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation on the Postsecondary Success (PS) team. As an APO, Ed’s responsibilities included managing a portfolio of grants and contracts valued at more than $133 million; over $20 million dedicated to institutional transformation at HBCUs and large Urban-Serving Universities. In his work, he partnered with other funders, technical assistance providers, and higher education institutions to document and share promising practices that facilitate greater student access and success. In addition to his grant making activities at the foundation, Ed played a key leadership role on the PS team, including spearheading the development of cross-team strategy to ensure equitable grant making practices, embedding greater analytical rigor into the team’s institutional partnership selection process, and launching a foundation-wide Race Matters Series – a platform to foster dialogue around contemporary social justice issues. Ed served as a Process Improvement Associate supporting the Chief Strategy Officer in the Office of Institutional Effectiveness at Howard University. There Ed’s work focused on institutional effectiveness, process improvement, and change management across various areas, including enrollment management, financial aid, and operations. Prior to his time at Howard, Ed was a General Business Analyst with McKinsey & Company where he worked on a diverse range of projects, spanning strategy and operations, in the U.S. and South Africa. Ed is a graduate of Morehouse College in Atlanta, where he majored in Economics. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, Ed has a passion for education and has focused his career on ensuring those that have the furthest to travel on their own educational journey receive the support, encouragement and engagement needed to achieve their dreams.

Ed Smith-Lewis' Resources

Clemencia Cosentino

Clemencia Cosentino

Section Head and Chief Evaluation Officer, National Science Foundation

Nancy Potok

Nancy Potok

Former U.S. Chief Statistician
Former Chief of Statistical and Science Policy at U.S. Office of Management and Budget

Dr. Nancy Potok Is the CEO of NAPx Consulting. She served as the Chief Statistician of the United States in the Executive Office of the President until January 2020, where she served as a Commissioner on the US Commission on Evidence-Based Policy Making and co-chair of the Federal Data Strategy. Prior to that, she served as Deputy Director and Chief Operating Officer of the U.S. Census Bureau; Deputy Under Secretary for Economic Affairs at the US Department of Commerce; Senior Vice President for Economic, Labor, and Population Studies at NORC at the University of Chicago; and Chief Operating Officer at McManis & Monsalve Associates, a data analytics and organizational transformation firm. She has been an adjunct professor and Senior Fellow at The George Washington University and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, non-resident fellow at the Urban Institute, and chairs the Board of Trustees for the Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics at UCLA. She also serves on the Board of Visitors for the University of Pittsburgh School of Computing and Information and is a contributing editor to the Harvard Data Science Review. She received her Ph.D. from The George Washington University Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration.